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NHS FPX 4000 Assessment 2 Applying Research Skills

Nurs FPX 4000 Assessment 2

Student Name

Capella University

NHS-FPX 4000 Developing a Health Care Perspective

Prof. Name

Date

Applying Research skills

 Medication errors can be described as a failure in the medication management process. It can be due to improper prescription, administration, or inaccurate medication records that can potentially damage the patient, resulting in poor health outcomes (Mosisa et al., 2022). The growing incidences of medication errors have developed my interest into this topic. As a healthcare provider, I must prioritize initiatives to prevent these errors in my nursing practice.

In the professional context, I have observed various medication errors in my organization where healthcare providers administered incorrect medication, misread prescriptions, and neglected possible drug interactions, leading to severe patient complications. Thus, it is essential to tackle the underlying causes and put strong protections in place to reduce medication errors and ensure patient safety.

Peer-reviewed Journal Articles Relevant to Medication Errors

Many peer-reviewed journal articles are available on different databases that address medication errors and the potential strategies to minimize them. The selected articles for annotated bibliography are gathered from various databases, including the Capella University Library and outside resources like BioMed Central, Science Direct, Google Scholar, CINAHL, and PubMed.

To increase the search efficiency of desired articles, I used appropriate keywords like “medication errors”, “medication safety”, and “medication administration”. The selected papers for annotated bibliography are recently published and relevant to the topic of interest as they present the information and knowledge with the most recent developments for reducing medication errors in healthcare settings. 

Assessing the Credibility and Resources of Relevance 

Evaluating the credibility and relevance of resources is a crucial step in any research process. The CRAAP criteria are applied to evaluate the value and dependability of the sources, which stands for currency, relevance, authority, accuracy, and purpose (Lowe et al., 2021). The credibility of resources can be ensured by; the articles being published within five years, the source responding explicitly to our research topic of medication errors, the authors and journal is credentialed, previous articles supporting their findings, and the purpose supports the objectives of the related topic of medication error.

The reason for selecting reliable, evidence-based sources in the annotated bibliography on medication error is that these sources collectively offer comprehensive insights into the widespread issue of medication errors in pediatric settings. They also address the prevalence of errors in outpatient and home settings with emphasis on the importance of dosage accuracy, communication, and caregiver education. Lastly, these resources also highlight the role of advanced technologies like CDSS and eMAR systems in enhancing medication safety.

Annotated Bibliography

Stipp, M. M., Deng, H., Kong, K., Moore, S., Hickman, R. L., & Nanji, K. C. (2022). Medication safety in the perioperative setting: A comparison of methods for detecting medication errors and adverse medication events. Medicine, 101(44), e31432. https://doi.org/10.1097/md.0000000000031432  

This research study investigates medication errors (MEs) with a focus on the differences between direct observation and self-reporting approaches for identifying these incidents. It was revealed in this study that there are several types of MEs, including labeling errors, incorrect doses, and omission errors. The study underlines the need for various strategies to identify and manage drug errors in perioperative care and advises enhancing event reporting templates.

It was concluded that pharmacy-prepared meds and barcode-assisted administration could handle the difficulties of managing drugs in a fast-paced surgical environment to improve patient safety. The rationale to add this article is it is crucial to acknowledge the gaps in capturing perioperative medication incidents through direct observation versus self-reporting. Understanding these differences is vital for refining reporting strategies and improving medication safety in perioperative settings.

 Shahzeydi, A., Farzi, S., Tarrahi, M. J., & Babaei, S. (2023). Exploring internship nursing students’ experiences regarding the effect of supervision model implementation on medication safety: A descriptive qualitative study. Journal of Education and Health Promotion, 12(1), 266. https://doi.org/10.4103/jehp.jehp_1250_22 

NHS FPX 4000 Assessment 2 Applying Research Skills

This paper disclosed the impact of implementing a clinical supervision model on medication safety among nursing students. Medication errors are a significant concern in healthcare, and the article aims to help students decrease this area. The study included 15 nursing students and used qualitative approaches to acquire information about their experiences. Major outcomes of the clinical supervision approach include improved drug safety competence, increased trust, and reduced student stress.

The research emphasizes the significance of competent clinical supervision in improving medication safety and students’ clinical abilities. This research article is added because it is essential to emphasize the effectiveness of the clinical supervision model in enhancing medication safety skills among nursing internship students. The results of this study highlight the model’s impact on medication administration principles, error reduction, accurate calculations, and overall improvement in clinical performance through constructive feedback.

Liang, M. Q., Thibault, M., Jouvet, P., Lebel, D., Schuster, T., Moreault, M.-P., & Motulsky, A. (2023). Improving medication safety in a pediatric hospital: A mixed-methods evaluation of a newly implemented computerized provider order entry system. BMJ Health & Care Informatics, 30(1), e100622. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjhci-2022-100622  

This article advocates the adoption of a Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) system in a hospital context, including its adoption for pediatric prescribing that will result in major changes in resolving medication errors. Most errors occurred during the nurse-administering step, emphasizing the need for better safety precautions, particularly in pediatric settings. Nurses and pharmacy technicians benefited from this activity, which improved efficiency and reduced medication errors.

NHS FPX 4000 Assessment 2 Applying Research Skills

In hospital settings, using a Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) enhances the management of allergies and drug interactions, decreasing medication errors. The study was included here because it emphasizes the significance of enhancing electronic medication administration (eMAR) in mitigating medication errors. Adopting this aligns with the need for improved healthcare technology for patient safety. It was recommended in this study to develop proactive event reporting systems, and system-based suggestions highlight the importance of a comprehensive approach to error prevention and reporting.

Chew, C.-C., HSS, A.-S., Chan, H.-K., & Hassali, M. A. (2019). Medication safety at home: A qualitative study on caregivers of chronically ill children in Malaysia. Hospital Pharmacy, 55(6), 001857871985171. https://doi.org/10.1177/0018578719851719  

This paper addresses the significant issue of medication errors in pediatric patients in Malaysia. It highlights the higher risk of medication errors in children due to the need for accurate dosing based on age and weight. Caregivers, particularly parents who care for small children, are vulnerable to medication errors. These errors are caused by communication breakdowns between healthcare personnel and caregivers, who may have difficulty understanding prescription instructions.

The paper emphasizes the need to increase communication, provide clear instructions, and educate the family to improve medication errors for pediatric patients. This particular study on medication errors in child caregiving in Malaysia supports an understanding of the critical need for improving medication safety in home settings. The findings highlight the importance of implementing effective strategies, such as clearer instructions and medication diaries, to mitigate errors and enhance child healthcare.

Learnings from Annotated Bibliography

Some of the acquired learnings from the annotated bibliography are summarized here. While Stipp et al. (2020) elaborated on communication barriers and inappropriate doses as frequent causes of medication errors in pediatric outpatient settings, Sedigheh et al. (2020) mentioned the integration of CDS systems (to revise prescriptions) in healthcare to minimize medication errors. The study by Liang et al. (2023) provided a learning that barcode scanning and eMAR devices are useful for avoiding medication administration errors.

Lastly, the findings of Chew et al. (2019) explained that medication errors at patient-level highlight the significance of caregiver education and clear communication. Overall, this assessment helped to develop and understand the annotated bibliography for incorporating evidence-based research to improve the healthcare system by reducing medication errors.

References

 Chew, C.-C., HSS, A.-S., Chan, H.-K., & Hassali, M. A. (2019). Medication safety at home: A qualitative study on caregivers of chronically ill children in Malaysia. Hospital Pharmacy, 55(6), 001857871985171. https://doi.org/10.1177/0018578719851719  

Liang, M. Q., Thibault, M., Jouvet, P., Lebel, D., Schuster, T., Moreault, M.-P., & Motulsky, A. (2023). Improving medication safety in a pediatric hospital:  Mixed-methods evaluation of a newly implemented computerized provider order entry system. BMJ Health & Care Informatics, 30(1), e100622. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjhci-2022-100622  

Lowe, M. S., Macy, K. V., Murphy, E., & Kani, J. (2021). Questioning CRAAP. Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 21(3). https://doi.org/10.14434/josotl.v21i3.30744

NHS FPX 4000 Assessment 2 Applying Research Skills

Mosisa, B. (2022). Assessment of medication errors in emergency ward at Nekemte Referral Hospital, West Ethiopia. Open Access Journal of Biomedical Science, 4(1). https://doi.org/10.38125/oajbs.000398  

Shahzeydi, A., Farzi, S., Tarrahi, M. J., & Babaei, S. (2023). Exploring internship nursing students’ experiences regarding the effect of supervision model implementation on medication safety: A descriptive qualitative study. Journal of Education and Health Promotion, 12(1), 266. https://doi.org/10.4103/jehp.jehp_1250_22 

Stipp, M. M., Deng, H., Kong, K., Moore, S., Hickman, R. L., & Nanji, K. C. (2022). Medication safety in the perioperative setting: A comparison of methods for detecting medication errors and adverse medication events. Medicine, 101(44), e31432. https://doi.org/10.1097/md.0000000000031432